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Health Experts Criticise Magazine for 'Celebrating Obesity'

While only Sports Illustrated was singled out in this instance, the problem of 'obese shows' and 'obese' models in magazines is endemic

Edited by Tamara A Orlova and Joe Alvarez

The Australian health expert warned the American magazine they should stop promoting “unhealthy-looking” women, like those who strutted on the runway during the fashion show from July.

According to the Aussie doctor, Sports Illustrated does nothing but encourage young women from all around to the world to become overweight and unhealthy because when they see these plus size models they will automatically think its ok to look like that.

The fashion show organized earlier in July in Miami has sparked a really heated debate after several plus size models slipped into these tiny swimsuits, becoming the stars of the night, writes The Telegraph. 

“It seems to me that women who wear bigger sizes on the podium are less representative for the average woman. Instead, they are representative of a major problem of our society,” wrote a journalist in Sydney’s Daily Telegraph. 

“By choosing plus size models to promote certain brands does nothing but promote the irresponsible message that you don’t have to do anything to lose weight”, added the woman.

MJ Day, one of the editors of Sports Illustrated it’s a ‘proud of her curves’ woman and said she wanted to show the world that plus size can also be considered beautiful.

State Department head of Australian Medical Association from New South Wales, Brad Frankum, said: "We don't want anyone to feel ashamed or embarrassed by the way they look," The Daily Telegraph quoted him saying, "... but there is a difference between being confident in who you are and promoting a healthy weight message. It's a difficult message but just like we don't use cigarettes to promote products I don't think we should have unhealthy weights promoting products."

Sports Illustrated 2018 Runway Collection Swim Week Show

Sports Illustrated 2018 Runway Collection Swim Week Show

Sports Illustrated 2018 Runway Collection Swim Week Show

Sports Illustrated 2018 Runway Collection Swim Week Show

While doctors raise valid question about celebrating obesity, another model on the verge of obesity – Ashley Graham – is ‘effortlessly’ landing front covers of glossy magazines.

According to the official trivia, Ashley Graham is 175cm high and weights 91kg, which leaves her BMI in region of 29.7. That is of course, providing that the official stats don't bend the facts just slightly. A person with a BMI of 30 is categorised as obese. Just one more kilogram added to Ashley’s ‘ample wobbly assets’ (92kg) and she will be welcomed to the ‘obesity ranks’.

While NHS.uk suggests that the person with Ashley Graham’s BMI is “consuming more calories than they need and recommends to start losing around 1 – 2 pounds a week”, editors of glossy women’s magazines are seemingly searching to promote obesity and thus ‘unhealthy living’ at any cost. 

The Australian health expert warned the American magazine they should stop promoting “unhealthy-looking” women, like those who strutted on the runway during the fashion show from July.

According to the Aussie doctor, Sports Illustrated does nothing but encourage young women from all around to the world to become overweight and unhealthy because when they see these plus size models they will automatically think its ok to look like that.

The fashion show organized earlier in July in Miami has sparked a really heated debate after several plus size models slipped into these tiny swimsuits, becoming the stars of the night, writes The Telegraph. 

MJ Day, one of the editors of Sports Illustrated it’s a ‘proud of her curves’ woman and said she wanted to show the world that plus size can also be considered beautiful.

Ashley Graham's BMI NHS.UK
Ashley Graham's BMI NHS.UK

There are serious concerns that as long as obesity is being glamorised and normalised in some quarters, plus sized models are lauded, and goverment provides 'disability benefits' to obese people, we can't expects the situation to change.

Health Complications of Obesity

Obesity increases the risk of developing a number of serious health conditions, including but not limited to:

  • Coronary heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Stroke
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Sleep apnea
  • Gallstones
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Infertility or irregular periods

A 2009 study published in the journal PLOS Medicine suggested that being obese/overweight is responsible for more than 200,000 deaths in the United States each year.